Siege of Carthage, 146BC

SIEGE OF CARTHAGE

SIEGE OF CARTHAGE

146BC

SUMMARY

The siege of Carthage was the final blow of the Punic Wars, with Rome systematically destroying the city after a three-year siege.

BACKGROUND

Carthage had suffered a series of military and political defeats in the years since the Second Punic War, which left it vulnerable to attack. Sensing weakness, Rome contrived to declare war and marched on the city of Carthage itself.

LOCATION

Carthage, near Tunis, Tunisia

THE ROMANS

80,000 infantry and 4,000 cavalry led by Scipio

THE CARTHAGINIANS

30,000 troops, 300 elephants, and 4,000 cavalry as well as around 350,000 civilians.

BATTLE

After a three-year siege, a Roman assault finally managed to breach the city walls. After a week of heavy fighting throughout the city the defenders were thoroughly defeated and the Roman legions completely sacked and destroyed the town.

RESULT

Complete destruction of Carthage.

CONSEQUENCE

Carthage ceased to exist, with its land divided between Romans and local farmers.

 

Pictures Source: pixabay.com

Please follow and like us:
  • Tags: ,

Related articles

SIEGE OF CICERO’S CAMP

Siege of Cicero’s Camp, 54-53BC

SIEGE OF CICERO’S CAMP – GALLIC WAR Winter 54-53BC SUMMARY The siege of Cicero’s camp was a key event in the Gallic wars, when multiple tribes came together to attempt to rid their lands of Roman invaders. The Gauls took advantage of the exhausted and thinly spread legions returning from Britain for the winter, and […]

Corbridge, Battle of, 918

Corbridge, Battle of, 918

THE BATTLE OF CORBRIDGE – VIKING INVASION unknown date in 918 SUMMARY This was a battle fought between the Vikings led by Ragnall and the combined forces of Constantine II of Scotland and Ealdred of Bamburgh —-oOo—- BACKGROUND The Viking Ragnall had previously driven Ealdred out of Bamburgh. He had allied with Constantine II of Scotland to try to […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Site created March 22nd 2013. Info@UnderstandingWars.com